The perspectives and skills acquired by students in politics classes will serve them in a wide range of career fields, including public service, law, politics, business, and journalism.

The Politics Program is designed to assist students in developing the arts of deliberation and judgment by which they may understand more fully and participate more effectively in public affairs. Analytical reasoning, effective writing, and proficiency in basic research techniques are skills cultivated and used throughout the program.

Emphasis is placed not so much on the changing details of current events, but on the philosophical, historical, and institutional nature of the persistent problems that current issues illustrate. Students can anticipate a rigorous inquiry into political philosophy, American government, comparative government, and international relations. Students are offered a diversity of non-classroom learning experiences. The Politics Program encourages independent study, internships, and off-campus academic programs.

 

Read about the POLITICS program:

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Your Major Took You Where?

A Sampling of Recent Centre Graduates

 

EMPLOYER

 

POST-GRADUATE STUDY

Commission on Presidential Debates Case Western Reserve University (J.D., international law)
Senator Pat Toomey University of Cincinnati (M.B.A., business administration)
Courthouse Courier Washington & Lee School of Law (J.D., criminal law)
Americans for Tax Reform University of Louisville School of Law (J.D., human/civil rights)
Strategic Marketing, SM University of Southern California (M.A., film studies)

Benjamin Knoll

Photo of  Benjamin  Knoll
John Marshall Harlan Associate Professor of Politics, Chair of Politics Program, Politics Work Crounse Hall—462 Work Phone: 859.238.5281 Website: personal website
Biography

Benjamin Knoll came to Centre in 2010 as assistant professor of government, and was named a Centre Scholar in 2013. He was appointed John Marshall Harlan Associate Professor of Politics in 2016.

Knoll’s area of expertise is American politics with a specialization in public opinion and voting behavior, specifically, race and politics, religion and politics, and political psychology.

He was a regional finalist for the 2014 Kentucky Secretary of State Outstanding Civic Education Leadership Award. He is the director of the “Boyle County Exit Poll” and “Colonel’s Canvass Survey,” which are “experiential learning” projects for students in his courses.

Knoll’s research has been published in The Journal of Politics, Political Behavior, Social Science Research, Research and Politics, Social Science Quarterly, American Politics Research, PS: Politics Science and Politics, Psychological Reports, and International Migration Review

Knoll graduated summa cum laude with a B.A. in political science from Utah State University, and earned a M.A. and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Iowa.

Email: benjamin.knoll@centre.edu

File last updated: 4/20/16

Chris Paskewich

Photo of  Chris  Paskewich
Associate Professor of Politics •  Politics Work Crounse Hall—324 Work Phone: 859.238.5239
Biography

Christopher Paskewich joined Centre’s faculty in 2009. He is an associate professor of government, and was named a Centre Scholar in 2012.

His teaching interests include political philosophy, political ideology, American political thought, and political economy. He has recently done research in ancient Greek political thought and in Catholic political theology. He is currently researching the Federalist papers, as well as recent Marxist reactions to terrorism.

Paskewich received a B.S. in mathematics and philosophy and a M.S. in economics from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He earned a M.A and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Connecticut.

Email: c.paskewich@centre.edu

File last updated: 8/27/15

 

 
 

Daniel G. Stroup

Photo of  Daniel G. Stroup
Pierce and Amelia Harrington Lively Professor of Politics and Law • Pre-law Advisor Politics Work Crounse Hall—471 Work Phone: 859.238.5246
Biography

Daniel Stroup has taught at Centre College since 1976 and was named the Lively Professor of Government and Law in 2005.

Stroup’s teaching and research interests encompass American political history, the judicial process, the legislative process, and The Civil Rights Movement in America. Along with Professor Bill Garriott, Stroup teaches a unique government course that simulates the U.S. Congress. Centre students have the opportunity to play the roles of congressmen in the House of Representatives, cabinet members, lobbyists or journalists, and one student portrays the President. Stroup also teaches a seminar on the history of The Civil Rights Movement.

Stroup has published articles in journals including Valparaiso Law Review and PS: Political Science and Politics, as well as a segment of The Kentucky Encyclopedia.

Stroup graduated magna cum laude from the University of Dayton (B.A.) and holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in government from the University of Virginia.

In the greater Danville community, he has been active in the parents association of the Danville Montessori School, and Citizens Concerned for Human Relations, a local group that focuses on race relations.

Email: dan.stroup@centre.edu

File last updated: 8/8/13

Notes

EXPERT: American political history — The judicial process — The legislative process — The Civil Rights movement in America — The Supreme Court

Teaching and research interests encompass American political history, the judicial process, the legislative process, and the Civil Rights movement in America. Team teaches (with professor William Garriott) a government course that simulates the U.S. Congress. Has published articles in journals including Valparaiso Law Review and PS: Political Science and Politics, as well as a segment of The Kentucky Encyclopedia.