The goal of the Philosophy Program is to teach students to think, write, and speak clearly and logically, and be able to analyze and compare values. These skills are invaluable in everyday life as well as in any occupation that demands leadership and administrative ability.

The philosophy major or minor is therefore a very useful preparation for a wide variety of careers. Because philosophy deals with so many questions that overlap with other disciplines, the major or minor in philosophy also works very well when taken jointly with majors or minors in other programs.

Philosophy students read and debate the writings of great philosophers in the past as well as those of contemporary thinkers. Some typical philosophical questions are: What is the difference between believing something to be true and knowing it to be true? Are we free moral agents, or are all our actions necessitated or predetermined? What is the relation between consciousness or thought and the kinds of things that go on in a brain or computer? What makes an argument valid or a decision rational? Courses in philosophy commonly involve a good deal of class discussion and numerous small writing assignments in which students develop their ability to analyze texts, argue for a position, and write clearly.

A common sequence for a philosophy major to follow includes taking one 100-level course in the first year, PHI 210 and 220 in the sophomore year, and three courses numbered 300 or above in both the junior and senior year. However, the order in which these courses can be taken is quite flexible.

 

Read about the PHILOSOPHY program:

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Eva Cadavid

Photo of  Eva  Cadavid
Associate Professor of Philosophy • Chair of Philosophy Program Philosophy Work Crounse Hall—433 Work Phone: 859.238.5945
Biography

Eva Cadavid joined Centre’s faculty in 2008. She is associate professor of philosophy.

Before coming to Centre, Cadavid taught at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, and also taught as an adjunct instructor at the Eastman School of Music.

She graduated from Florida International University with a B.A. in philosophy and a B.S. in chemistry. She earned her master’s in philosophy from the University of Rochester and her Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Rochester. She is fluent in Spanish and English, and can read fluently in French and Ancient Greek.

Email: eva.cadavid@centre.edu

File last updated: 8/6/13

Megs Gendreau

Photo of  Megs Gendreau
Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Environmental Studies Philosophy Work Crounse Hall—457 Work Phone: 859.238.5433
Biography

Megs Gendreau joined the Centre College faculty in 2018 as assistant professor of philosophy and environmental studies.

Her areas of interest include philosophy of sport, environmental philosophy, environmental justice, political and social philosophy, and post-Hegelian German philosophy.

Before coming to Centre, Gendreau was an assistant professor of philosophy at Cal Poly Pomona and a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Philosophy and Environmental Studies at Bowdoin College.

Gendreau earned a B.A. in humanities and social sciences from Hampshire College, an M.A. from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of California, Riverside.

Email: megs.gendreau@centre.edu

W. David Hall

Photo of  W. David  Hall
W. George Matton Professor of Religion & Philosophy Religion, Philosophy Work Crounse Hall—331 Work Phone: 859.238.5269 Website: Personal Web site:
Biography

W. David Hall joined the Centre faculty in 2002, and in 2005 received the Kirk Award for excellence in teaching. He was named a Centre Scholar in 2007, and held the NEH endowed professorship from 2010 to 2013. He has served as chair of the religion program. Prior to coming to Centre College, he taught for two years as visiting assistant professor of religious studies at DePaul University in Chicago.

Dr. Hall’s primary research interest is 19th- and 20th-century European thought. He is co-editor of and contributor to a recent volume of essays entitled Paul Ricoeur and Contemporary Moral Thought (Routledge, 2002), and is the author of Paul Ricoeur and the Poetic Imperative: The Creative Tension Between Love and Justice (SUNY, 2007). His approach is broadly interdisciplinary, addressing currents within philosophy, literary theory, and the social sciences, and their impact on contemporary theology and ethics. His current interests concern questions of political agency within the context of modern notions of state sovereignty.

Dr. Hall received a B.A. in rhetoric from California State University in Sacramento. He attended graduate school at the University of Chicago, where he received an M.Div. and a Ph.D.

Email: wdavid.hall@centre.edu

File last updated: 6/26/17

Notes

Watch a photo essay highlighting Dr. Hall’s Basketball as Religion class.

Andrew Roche

Photo of  Andrew  Roche
Paul L. Cantrell Associate Professor of Philosophy • Chair of the Humanities Program Philosophy Work Crounse Hall—427 Work Phone: 859.238.5462
Biography

Andrew Roche joined Centre’s faculty in 2009. He is Paul L. Cantrell Associate Professor of Philosophy, has served as chair of the philosophy program, and was named a Centre Scholar in 2012. He taught previously at the University of Oklahoma and Wheaton College.

His areas of specialization include Kant (theoretical philosophy), early modern philosophy, and philosophy of mind.

Roche received a B.A. in philosophy and French from Amherst College, and a Ph.D. in philosophy from Harvard University.

Email: andrew.roche@centre.edu

File last updated: 10/9/19